Treasures

This page is filled with miscellaneous, fun little treasures we’ve picked up along the way. Some new, some old, and some new that look old. A few were spur-of-the-moment flea market finds, others were items being resold online that we just had to have. And each has a bit of a story that goes along with it.

This guy was our first, and a perfect example of "something new that looks old." While we certainly appreciate original antiques (as you'll see below), some items are just too cool to pass up. Like this replica radio that was found at a flea market on Elmwood for $10 (I talked him down to $8 - tough negotiator, I know). This radio has been mainstay entertainment throughout all of our projects, as Dan and I silently argue between today's hits and good old country music.
This guy was our first, and a perfect example of “something new that looks old.” While we certainly appreciate original antiques (as you’ll see below), some items are just too cool to pass up. Like this replica radio that was found at a flea market on Elmwood for $10 (I talked him down to $8 – tough negotiator, I know). This radio has been mainstay entertainment throughout all of our projects, as Dan and I silently argue between today’s hits and good old country music.
Hello, hello? Anybody there? Another
Hello, hello? Anybody there? Another “new that looks old” item, this old school-looking phone was our initial Craigslist find. The good thing about replicas (aside from them being cheap) is that they’re sometimes fully-functioning. I got a thrill out of hooking this up at home and testing it out. Making phone calls from my “early 20th century” phone
This one was an anniversary present to Dan. He mentioned in passing finding a
This one was an anniversary present to Dan. He mentioned in passing finding a “really cool” typewriter on Craigslist, and that was that. Until a month later I surprised him with this 25lb, 1920’s LC Smith #8 typewriter (accompanied by a typed up letter, of course). Took a bit of playing around with the ink spools, but I eventually got it to work, although – my hands were black from ink for the next three days.
Side story: When I went to pick up the typewriter from the older gent I bought it from, he and his wife happened to be in the garage, and gave me a tour of his bright yellow 1967 mustang GT, revving the engine and all. Not one for cars, but definitely pretty neat.
This one. Ugh. Dan decided that he loved his typewriter soooo much that he had to go out and get another one. And thus, this
This one. Ugh. Dan decided that he loved his typewriter soooo much that he had to go out and get another one. And thus, this “mini-me” version came along – a 1920’s, portable Corona typewriter that he just had to have. Kind of neat though, as both companies eventually merged to become LC Smith and Corona, and we now had one of each.
Ever wonder how folks did quick math before the calculator? Well, here's your answer. This big hunk of metal, also known as an adding machine, was the first of its kind. They eventually made smaller, more agile versions, but its still pretty cool to have an original. In working order, none-the-less.
Ever wonder how folks did quick math before the calculator? Well, here’s your answer. This big hunk of metal, also known as an adding machine, was the first of its kind. They eventually made smaller, more agile versions, but its still pretty cool to have an original. In working order, none-the-less.
Advertisements

One thought on “Treasures

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s